Schedule

Jump to: SeptemberOctoberNovemberDecember

August 19: Introductions

overview of class syllabus and projects; setting up your blog & RSS feeds; discussion: what is multimodal composition and digital scholarship? why should you care?

in-class

  • A Resolution on Writing,” by Hugh Burns (:60)
  • Fisch, McLeod, & Brenman’s “2008 Latest Edition – Did You Know 3.0…” (5:16)
  • introduction to me and my teaching philosophy
  • 5-minute overview of class purpose and assignment sequence
  • read students’ syllabus blog responses from Spring 09
  • introduce syllabus: how the blog works, updated blog posts, grades, expectations, readings/schedule (questions?)
  • student reflection examples: Adam‘s, Andrew‘s, Matt‘s, Susan‘s, Kate‘s
  • BREAK
  • why are we using blogs as class portfolios? (examples, blog application affordances, domains)
  • setting up your blog on WordPress
  • BREAK
  • 15-minute lecture on history of writing studies and the role of multimodality (pie-charts) (Michael’s “Hail Mary“)
  • reading prep
  • homework review

homework:

  1. Choose a blog template, making sure it has all the features you need (from class discussion).
  2. Create an About page and/or bio on your blog.
  3. Add a link in your blog to this course blog (e.g., http://www.ceball.com/classes/239/fall09)
  4. Email me (cball at ilstu dot edu) your blog URL by 8am next Wednesday.
  5. Write a blog post describing why you choose the blog template and widgets you did.
  6. Subscribe to the class blog’s RSS feed. (rss-feed-setup tutorial video. You may also choose to subscribe to your classmates’ blog feeds, but that is optional.)
  7. By next Wednesday at 8am, complete the syllabus-response blog post (see course blog postings for details).
  8. All students read Gunther Kress’s Multimodalities (21 pages)
  9. Graduate students also read

August 26: Key Issues and Terms

What is the role of multimodal composition within digital scholarship?; key issues in the field; and what’s not considered (yet) to be a key issue, and why not? and how might that change?

in class:

  • introductions/presentation of blogs
  • discussion of reading(s): key points from “Multimodalities”?
  • BREAK
  • working from current “disciplinary conversations” (issues; values; academic jargon)
  • a little more about past projects students created
  • what is *your* area of interest? how do you find more info about it?
  • BREAK

homework:

SEPTEMBER

September 2: Kairos, Disciplinary Conversations, and Audience

a close look at the publication venue for our major projects and its standing in digital scholarship

in class:

  • discuss values of digital media scholarship in relation to Kuhn’s “The Components of Scholarly Multimedia
  • compare Kuhn’s piece (using her and other class’s values) to Miles et al.’s (2003) Violence of Text
  • BREAK
  • discuss history/purpose of Kairos
  • how does form/content, purpose, credibility, quality, and audience(s) shift?
  • rhetoric of blog designs discussion (what works, what doesn’t)

homework:

  • Read Kairos “About” page (online)
  • review the CFP for the Kairos special issue on undergraduate research (textual & video)
  • revisit your 3 ideas, or come up with new ones, and choose 1 or 2 that you’d like to workshop next week. Write up those ideas on your blog (see class blog post)
  • Graduate students also read Jim Kalmbach’s “Ten Years of Nonlinear (Kairos) History” (online)
  • Graduate students also read Douglas Eyman’s “The Arrow and the Loom” (online)

September 9: CFPs and Your Proposal

what is a CFP? lead-in to major project through your manifesto, proposal, and pitch

in-class

homework:

September 16: Crafting Your Idea

understanding what reviewers of a journal (as another audience for your project) will be looking for, and how these items relate to your own values of digital media projects.

in class:

  • discuss peer-review criteria
  • workshop proposal drafts using peer-review criteria
  • BREAK
  • transitioning from proposals to pitches
  • BREAK
  • discuss peer-review assignment
  • walk through original RiceBall piece
  • discuss peer-review letters (in revised RiceBall piece, under Remote>Special Features>Reviews: Editorial Review 1 and 2)

homework:


September 23: Pitching Your Idea & Project Overview

  • pitch your idea to classmates
  • anonymous voting
  • BREAK
  • finalists and choosing groups
  • what does working on this project look like? (new media scholarship composing/revision processes)

homework:

  • meet with groups to strategize workflow
  • compose a single, revised project proposal for your group following the Kairos CFP guidelines
  • compose a TEAM CONTRACT & workflow/timeline (see blog post about work plan)
  • complete draft of your peer-review assignment


September 30: Submitting Your Proposals

in class:

  • turn in paper copy of peer-review assignment
  • workshop final project proposals (email final version to Cheryl by noon Wednesday)
  • discuss team contracts & timelines
  • group work

homework:

additional/reference reading: Accessible Digital Media: Design Guidelines for Electronic Publications, Multimedia and the Web (read the first six links: Introduction, Educational Issues, Educational Policies, Disability & Access Tips, Tools for Access, and Access Issues)

OCTOBER


October 7: Design & Accessibility

how do you design your project so that form:content aligns? how and why do you make your project accessible to multiple audiences? storyboards & filming techniques

in-class

  • discuss design principles & accessibility issues
  • applying design & accessibility principles
  • BREAK
  • filming techniques & getting talent-permission.consent
  • storyboards: planning your multimodal project

homework:

advanced/optional readings:

October 14: Fair Use/Copyright/Ethics and IRB/Citation Practices

in class:

  • discussion of copyright, Fair Use & citation practices in digital media
  • using Zotero for collecting and organizing assets/citations
  • group work

homework:

  • finish gathering project assets — have in digital format by the time class starts next week.

October 21: Large-Scale Editing

organizing, logging digital assets, video-editing, & creating a rough cut

in-class:

  • how to organize your assets
  • importing and logging digital assets into software
  • creating a rough cut (organized version of roughly edited clips according to storyboard) of your project in your chosen software program
  • create a mock-up of the website that will house your other digital assets (video, etc.)

homework:

  • finish rough cut of project & webtext mock-up; due by start of class next week
  • bring additional sound/audio-track assets to import/manipulate next week

October 28: Small-Scale Editing + Soundtracks/Audio-Editing + Exporting

clarifying purpose of project through rough-cut review; trimming clips, editing text, timing issues with audio/video, adding titles/credits, adding transitions, rough-cutting soundtrack, testing exports, and building an initial relationship between video assets and webtext delivery

in-class:

  • work on the above issues in your projects

homework:

  • finish individual portions of project (video + webtext)

NOVEMBER

November 4: Fine-tuning

putting everything together

in-class

  • put finishing touches on video, including the above
  • put videos with webtexts
  • test web delivery

homework:

  • finish any last-minute changes
  • have a working version of your video & webtext (all together) ready by the beginning of class next week

November 11: Usability Testing & Peer-Review

in class:

  • workshop classmates’ projects using peer-review heuristic
  • compose individual peer-review letters and email to entire group, copying me, by Friday night

homework:

  • write on your blog how you plan to revise your group project based on the feedback (each person writes an individual post; then compare notes)

November 18: Revising

in class:

  • talk about how to choose how to revise based on letters
  • discuss revision strategies & work on revisions (blog post homework assignment)
  • overview of portfolio reflection assignment

homework:

  • complete editorial feedback response to me (in email) telling me which revisions your group is doing and which you are not (and why). This should be done as a group and emailed to me as a group. Due by start of next class (on Dec. 2).

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THANKSGIVING

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DECEMBER

December 2: portfolio and class wrap-up

  • watch final projects
  • what’s due when/where/how
  • discussion of learning outcomes (related to above)
  • class wrap-up
  • evaluations